Votto captures second Lou Marsh Trophy

 Etobicoke, Ont., native Joey Votto who played for Canada in the 2009 and 2013 World Baseball Classics has been named the 2017 Lou Marsh Trophy winner, as Canada's top athlete. Photo Credit: Baseball Canada

Etobicoke, Ont., native Joey Votto who played for Canada in the 2009 and 2013 World Baseball Classics has been named the 2017 Lou Marsh Trophy winner, as Canada's top athlete. Photo Credit: Baseball Canada

By Adam Morissette

Baseball Canada

OTTAWA- Joey Votto is now a two-time winner of the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada’s Athlete of the Year.

After winning the award in 2010, a year in which he also collected the National League’s Most Valuable Player award, the Etobicoke, Ont., native was selected by a panel of sports journalists from across Canada as the 2017 winner.

Votto’s exceptional 2017 season as the first baseman for the Cincinnati Reds saw him lead the National League in on-base percentage (OBP) (.454), walks (134), intentional walks (20) and on-base plus slugging percentage (OPS) (1.032). He was named to the National League All-Star team for the fifth time, was nominated for the league’s Hank Aaron Award, was narrowly edged out by then Miami Marlins slugger Giancarlo Stanton for the NL MVP Award and recently won the Canadian Baseball hall of Fame’s Tip O’Neill Award.

Votto, 34, beat out an exceptional group of Canadian athletes to win the Lou Marsh Award including Stanley Cup champion Sidney Crosby, world curling champion Rachel Homan and moguls world champion skier Mikael Kingsbury.

Votto (2010, 2017) along with Larry Walker (1998) and Fergie Jenkins (1974) are the only baseball players to ever win the Lou Marsh Trophy.

Adam Morissette

Adam Morissette was born and raised in Ottawa, Ont. where sports were always a big part of his life whether it be baseball, hockey or football, including playing two seasons as centre for coach Pat Sheahan with the Queen's University Golden Gaels in Kingston -- Canada's first capital. Morissette has always have been passionate about baseball and has fond memories of attending Montreal Expos games with his father, Mike, and listening to his recollection of watching baseball in Montreal at Jarry Park and stories about Gary Carter, Rusty Staub and Steve Rodgers. Morissette could often be found in a near empty Lynx Stadium watching Joe Siddall, Bert Heffernan, Curtis Pride and Jamie Carroll soaking in a beautiful summer night at the ballpark. He was a member of the provincial championship Orleans Red Sox Little League teams also played with the Ottawa White Sox for the late Lyle Anderson and Todd Burke in OBA Midget and American Legion play and the Capital City Crushers (NCBL), primarily as a catcher. Has also spent time coaching Little League in Orleans and South Ottawa. He wanted to turn his passion into a career and enrolled in Sport Business Management at Algonquin College in Ottawa in 2007. After working for the Ottawa 67's OHL team as the Ticket Coordinator, Morissette jumped at the opportunity to become the Media and Public Relations Coordinator with Baseball Canada in 2010. He loves watching and reading about pro, college or amateur baseball and is a long-time subscriber to Baseball America. Morissette is thrilled about the idea of writing about baseball and is interested in covering any story that his car -- and time -- will allow him to cover.