Reid-Foley following in brother's steps to the mound

 RHP Sean Reid-Foley, a second-round pick of the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014, is simply carrying on a family tradition: pitching pro ball. Photo: Tristan Garnett.

RHP Sean Reid-Foley, a second-round pick of the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014, is simply carrying on a family tradition: pitching pro ball. Photo: Tristan Garnett.

By Tristan Garnett

Toronto Observer

DUNEDIN, Fla. — Toronto Blue Jays prospect Sean Reid-Foley started playing baseball because of his brother, Los Angeles Dodgers prospect, David Reid-Foley.

As a kid, Sean Reid-Foley, a native of Jacksonville, Fla., was inspired watching his older brother and friends play on the diamond.

Separated by four years, the younger brother was forced into developing his game quickly.

“If I wanted to be on the field with them and the older guys, I had to play to their calibre so that they wouldn’t yell at me, or tell me to get off,” said Reid-Foley, during an interview from the Blue Jays’ Bobby Mattick Training Center. “That really helped me and motivated me.”

The 20-year-old Blue Jays pitching prospect made 25 combined starts for class-A Lansing and class-A Dunedin last season, amassing a 4-10 record along with 4.22 ERA. Toronto selected Reid-Foley in the second round (49th overall) of the 2014 draft.

Growing up, their difference in age prevented them from competing against one another in organized ball, but the Reid-Foley brothers finally faced off last season when the Lansing Lugnuts and the Great Lakes Loons clashed.

“It’s was actually really odd to be honest with you, it’s never been like that, because I was always in his dugout or he was always in my dugout so seeing him across where obviously we couldn’t talk, because we’re in a pro environment now,” said Reid-Foley.

“When he would pitch I obviously wanted him to do well but I obviously I wanted my team to rake off [homers] off of him because then I could mess with him but it was really cool. You don’t really get experiences like that a lot.”

Foley, is currently regarded as one of the Blue Jays’ top prospects, but he still appreciates advice from his brother and strongly values their relationship.

“He’s touched my baseball career a lot and he still does. I live with him now in the off-season and it’s a lot of fun. I’m with him for like 12 hours out of the day. I wouldn’t trade it for anything.”